Trending Topics
Some Like it Hot: RADIOACTIVE HOUSEWARES 
They belonged to my grandmother: six delicate dessert plates made from translucent greenish-yellowish glass with a pattern of apple blossoms embossed around the rim. My...
Beachcomber’s Diary 
Every winter brings king tides to the California coast—some of the highest and lowest tides of the year. King tide isn’t a scientific term, but...
Agatha Christie’s Surfing Safari 
[Surfing] is one of the most perfect physical pleasures that I have known. —Agatha Christie, An Autobiography In 1922, at the age of 31, British crime...
The Malibu Railway War 
This article was originally published April 21, 2023 in Topanga New Times. TNT’s features “The Train to Nowhere: Travels on the Hueneme, Malibu & Port...
NewsBeat

Join a Conversation on Los Angeles Wildlife Corridors 

On September 21, UCLA Sustainable LA Grand Challenge is hosting a conversation on Los Angeles wildlife corridors and a pending city of Los Angeles ordinance designed to protect them, which is currently open for public comment.

Wildlife corridors connect areas of habitat and provide a vital pathway through human development that could otherwise impede biological life of all kinds. Over time, structures like buildings, roads and fences can be barriers to wildlife movement and survival as they fragment the habitat into smaller and smaller pieces.

In April 2020 the California Fish and Wildlife Commission found that it may be warranted to list mountain lions as threatened under the California Endangered Species Act (CESA) within a proposed Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU) located in Southern California. This ESU includes the Santa Monica Mountains in Los Angeles. 

In July 2021, the UCLA Sustainable LA Grand Challenge released its Ecosystem Health Report Card for Los Angeles County, which dedicated a chapter to Land Use and Habitat Quality that covered habitat connectivity and fragmentation and corridor projects throughout the region. The report card found that only 57% of critical habitat corridors in the county are protected, and recommended policy to increase that protection to 100% to ensure no more extinction in one of the nation’s only biodiversity hotspots. 

The Los Angeles City Council is leading efforts to protect these irreplaceable natural resources as they contemplate the city’s first-ever pilot Wildlife Ordinance District, which was developed to balance wildlife habitat and connectivity with private property development and residents in western Los Angeles, mainly between the 101 and 405 freeways and within the Santa Monica Mountains. 

Learn more, or sign up to participate, at https://grandchallenges.ucla.edu

Related posts

Leave a Reply

Required fields are marked *