Trending Topics
The Open Ocean: Life at Sea 
The open ocean is a strange place, always shifting, always changing. It begins where coastal waters end, and it covers most of the planet—300 million...
The Hotel Arcadia 
It loomed above the beach like Count Dracula’s beach residence: stark, turreted, treeless, and not exactly inviting, but Dracula wasn’t written yet when the imposing...
PINNIPED PARTY! California Sea Lions 
They are fast and powerful swimmers and divers who love to hang out with their friends at the beach. When things are good, it’s a...
OVERBOARD! Yacht Harbor Mania 
“Believe me my young friend, there is nothing—absolutely nothing – half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats.” —Kenneth Grahame, The Wind...
NewsBeat

Snowy Plover Success Story 

Here’s a little bit of good news from up north. Western snowy plover pair has successfully nested on Carpinteria State Beach for the first time in more than 60 years.

Snowy plovers nest on the ground, depending on camouflage to avoid being seen. Unfortunately, that makes them highly vulnerable to unobservant humans. 

Biologists monitoring the site discovered three eggs in the nest last month and fenced the area off to protect the birds. The eggs have now successfully hatched. 

Once abundant, the snowy plover has experienced a catastrophic population decline before being placed on the California endangered species list. Snowy plovers are regular visitors at local beaches, including Topanga, but habitat loss due to rock revetments and other infrastructure, and human activities have made it difficult for them to breed throughout much of their historic range. Now, thanks to monitoring programs and a small army of volunteers, these birds are beginning to regain a foothold on the coast.

Related posts

Leave a Reply

Required fields are marked *